Name Jamelske, Eric

Title/Department professor, economics

Phone 715-836-3254

Email jamelsem@uwec.edu

Website https://people/jamelsem/research.htm

Topic areas Child health and nutrition (specifically children's fruit and vegetable consumption), climate change public opinion (specifically international views on climate change including China and the United States), public policy, environmental economics, health economics. Keywords: fruits and vegetables, climate change, health, environment, policy.

Notes Climate Change Public Opinion Student/Faculty Collaborative Research Project, Ongoing from 2009-Present. The importance of global climate change in society cannot be overstated. Specifically, China and the United States, as the world’s two largest economies and two largest greenhouse gas polluters, share prominent roles in the development of international climate change mitigation strategies. Our work includes conducting surveys to assess public views on a variety of climate change issues and policies across citizens in these two important countries. In particular, we are investigating public support for an international climate treaty and also the willingness of citizens to pay for the costs of climate change mitigation. Our work is conducted in teams and also involves reviewing the literature in this field as well as data analysis using a variety of computer programs. Additionally, this work offers the opportunity to participate in multiple oral and poster presentations to disseminate our work as well as the possible opportunity to travel, live and work in China. Lastly, our work has recently expanded to include climate change views in Vietnam and we are considering adding other countries of interest in the future. This work addresses a timely and important issue with meaningful national and international public policy implications and thus should be of broad interest across a wide variety of stakeholders and policymakers. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Student/Faculty Collaborative Research Project, Ongoing from 2006-Present. Fruit and vegetable consumption has been shown to improve health and reduce the risk of a variety of chronic diseases. However, poor nutrition among children, including low fruit and vegetable intake remains a reality contributing to obesity and other health problems which persist into adulthood at great cost to society. As a result, increasing children’s fruit and vegetable consumption has become an important focus among practitioners, policymakers and researchers. Our work involves partnering with area schools and organizations to measure children’s fruit and vegetable consumption in a variety of contexts including lunch and snack in an effort to assess how best to motivate children to eat more fruits and vegetables. In particular, we are investigating the degree to which encouragement and incentives can successfully increase children’s consumption. Most recently we have been focusing on ways to increase vegetable intake among children. Our work is conducted in teams and also involves reviewing the literature in this field as well as data analysis using a variety of computer programs. Additionally, this work offers the opportunity to participate in multiple oral and poster presentations to disseminate our work. This work addresses an important issue with meaningful public health and public policy implications and thus should be of broad interest across a wide variety of stakeholders and policymakers.

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